We praise people for being “naturally” smart, too, “naturally” athletic, and etc. But studies continue to show, as they have for some time now, that it is generally healthier to praise schoolchildren for being hardworking, than for being naturally gifted. We know now that to emphasize a child’s inherent ability places pressure on that child to continue to be accidentally talented, which is something that is hard for anyone to control. When the children who are applauded for their natural skills fail, they are shown to take the failure very personally. After all, the process of their success has always seemed mysterious and basic and inseparable from the rest of their identity, so it must be they who are failing as whole people. When students are instead complimented and rewarded for their effort and improvement, they tend to not be so hard on themselves. When they fail, they reason, “Well, I’ll work harder next time.” They learn that they are capable of success, rather than constantly automatically deserving of it, and they learn simultaneously that they are bigger and more complex than their individual successes or failures.

Kate of Eat the Damn Cake, The Stupidity of “Natural” Beauty  (via commovente)

HOW LONG HAVE I BEEN SAYING THIS FOR

(Source: eatthedamncake.com, via laterinthecaveoflesbians)

taliabobalia:

have you ever remained facebook friends with someone because they’re a special kinda idiot and you’re not imaginative enough to know what they’ll think of next?

This is true I would hate it if you laid your arm across my forehead and went to town

taliabobalia:

have you ever remained facebook friends with someone because they’re a special kinda idiot and you’re not imaginative enough to know what they’ll think of next?

This is true I would hate it if you laid your arm across my forehead and went to town

thank god for tumblr or we would have no way to let the world know that we are all just slob crybabies

Encore

At the end of a set, as everyone cheers for one more song, I’ll be the one in the back yelling GET OFF THE STAGE. NO MORE SONGS. WE HAVE WORK TOMORROW.

What

There is still something hilarious to me about emailing people with pitches. The thought of emailing someone and saying “hey do you think this thing is cool? Do you think it’s so cool that you want to pay me to learn and talk about it? Hmu”